Change 2.0 – The power of Social Media in managing organisational change.

24 02 2009

 

Employee communication is a key element within any successful organisational change programme.  Designing and implementing a co-ordinated communication plan is critical.  Communication can either help to make changes become effective quickly, or hinder changes by creating and fostering internal resistance to proposals. 

Some enlightened organisations are beginning to use social media tools e.g. Blogs, Twitter, etc, to supplement traditional communication tools such as briefings, meetings, one-to-one consultations, etc.  The word-of-mouth nature of social media can quickly spread messages, either good or bad, and the power of the crowd can be harnessed to promote or resist change. This is embracing the inherent power of new Web 2.0 technology, and many Change Management professionals are dubbing this Change 2.0.

I’m looking for examples of this… either ones where social media has been used effectively to positively promote change; or ones where social media has been used as a negative resistance mechanism by those opposing proposed changes. I would appreciate your ability and willingness to share any examples you may have by leaving a response on this site…

Thanks in advance.

James

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One response

24 02 2009
Heather Northey

James
I successfully introduced a discussion forum and chat room when running a change programme for the rail industry. The forum was independent of the client (Network Rail) and Regulator and was open to any industry participant.
The forum took about 6 months to gain sufficient momentum to be self sustaining and initially it was supported by the change team to answer questions and provide resources, but ultimately became a peer to peer network with mentoring and training support.
The site got the ultimate sanction when the most resistant workers, the signallers, started to participate, then there was no stopping it.
This tool was launched in 2001 and closed by NR in 2003 to industry uproar because they thought it undermined their authority! The credibility of the change programme then faltered.

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